New Stop Signs on Oak & Meridian Intersection | Neighbors Rejoice Over Installation

Citizens had been pressing the city to take the measure for years

PHOTO: Ben Tansey | SouthPasadenan.com News | New stop signs installed at the intersection of Meridian Ave and Oak St in South Pasadena

After lobbying for two decades, neighbors celebrated Tuesday, August 10, when the city at last installed stop signs for both north and southbound traffic along Meridian Ave. at Oak St..

PHOTO: Ben Tansey | SouthPasadenan.com News | New stop signs installed at the intersection of Meridian Ave and Oak St in South Pasadena
PHOTO: Provided by Wende Lee | SouthPasadenan.com News | New stop signs installed at the intersection of Meridian Ave and Oak St in South Pasadena

It’s the only place along Meridian where cars must stop over the mile long stretch between Monterey Rd and the city’s southern border at Kendall Ave. During the first day, most drivers stopped or at least slowed at the intersection, though a handful were seen barreling through despite the signage.

PHOTO: Ben Tansey | SouthPasadenan.com News | New stop signs installed at the intersection of Meridian Ave and Oak St in South Pasadena
PHOTO: Ben Tansey | SouthPasadenan.com News | New stop signs installed at the intersection of Meridian Ave and Oak St in South Pasadena

The stop signs went up after a unanimous July 21 vote by the City Council, which acted contrary to recommendation from its Mobility and Transportation Infrastructure Commission and a less than enthusiastic report from its Public Works Director, Shahid Abbas.

The Council deferred requests for stop signs along Meridian at Pine and Maple Streets to the MTIC, which at its meeting next Tuesday at 6:30 pm, is expected to ask city staff to provide traffic and speed data along the whole stretch of Meridian.

PHOTO: Ben Tansey | SouthPasadenan.com News | New stop signs installed at the intersection of Meridian Ave and Oak St in South Pasadena

 

 

Ben Tansey is a journalist and author. He grew up in the South Bay and is a graduate of Evergreen State College. He worked in Washington State as a reporter in a rural timber community and for many years as an editor for a Western electric energy policy publication based in Seattle. He and his wife Karin, an arts administrator from El Sereno, live in South Pasadena.