Throwback Thursday | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007

About a dozen years ago, sites along the Arroyo Seco looked much the way they do today

PHOTO: Rick Thomas Collection | SouthPasadenan.com News | Housing project nears completion obscuring a portion of the historic Colorado Street Bridge (2007)

In this week’s Throwback Thursday, we visit six sites along the Arroyo Seco taken by my daughter, Lauren Thomas, around twelve years ago (2007).

Only one structure no longer exists. Can you guess which one?

PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007
PHOTO: Lauren Thomas | SouthPasadenan.com News | Arroyo Seco Photo Essay 2007

Answer: Desiderio Army Reserve Center near the Colorado Street Bridge. The historic structure was demolished. Today, it is Desiderio Neighborhood Park.

Throwback Thursday is written and produced by Rick Thomas

 


Author Rick Thomas is the former museum curator and vice-chair of education for the South Pasadena Preservation Foundation. He served on the South Pasadena Natural Resources Commission, helping to maintain a strict policy protecting the city’s great old-growth trees. Using touchstone photographs from his own collection—one of the San Gabriel Valley’s largest accumulations of historical images and artifacts—as well as national, state, and local historical archives, Thomas provides a window to his city’s past and an understanding of why its preservation is so important.