‘To the Moon and Beyond’ | One Giant Leap…

Fifty years this month marks the 50th anniversary of the launch of the most demanding and technologically advanced voyages into space at the time

PHOTO: NASA | SouthPasadenan.com News | The Apollo 11 rocket iconically leaving the confines of our celestial home, marking the beginning of a new ear of space exploration

Indeed, it was one giant leap for mankind.

Following one and a half orbits, Apollo 11 got the go for what mission controllers on Earth called “Translunar Injection” sending Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin into the lunar module for the descent for the moon while Michael Collins, stayed back orbiting in the command module Columbia.

PHOTO: NASA | SouthPasadenan.com News | Mankind making his mark on the lunar surface 50 years ago

Fifty years this month marks the 50th anniversary of the launch of the most daring and most technologically advanced space adventures at the time.

Its feat in history is being honored in South Pasadena’s 2019 Festival of Balloons Fourth of July parade given the theme: “To the Moon and Beyond – 50 Years of Exploring America’s Freedom.”

July 20, 1969 at 7:56 p.m. on the West Coast, Armstrong readied himself to plant the first human foot on the moon as more than half a billion people watched on television. He stepped down the ladder, proclaiming: “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” Armstrong and Aldrin spent 2 ½ hours on the moon.

PHOTO: NASA | SouthPasadenan.com News | PHOTO: NASA | SouthPasadenan.com News | The Apollo 11 rocket iconically leaving the confines of our celestial home, marking the beginning of a new ear of space exploration

While a world watched, missing it all was Collins who didn’t hear it as his command module floated in space. “That’s all right, I don’t mind a bit,” he said, after listening to NASA telling him he was probably the only person around who did not have TV coverage of the scene when the astronauts were placing a flag on the surface of another world.

While Collins never walked on the moon, he had the task of bringing home Armstrong, Aldrin and himself home safely. There was no room for error.

“It if didn’t work right, they were dead,” Collins recently said on NBC’s Today Show.

Mission accomplished. The module’s engines successfully fired and the crew splashed down off Hawaii on July 24.

PHOTO: NASA | SouthPasadenan.com News | The Moon has captured the imagination of generations and was the key to the further exploration of our expansive solar system

President Kennedy’s challenge had been met, marking the day that a person from Earth walked on the moon and returned safely home.

After the mission, Armstrong called the experience “a beginning of a new age,” while Collins, like he still does today, talked about future journeys to Mars.

PHOTO: NASA | SouthPasadenan.com News | The Pale Blue Dot, Earth, home

Eight years earlier President Kennedy made the challenge to put a man on the moon before the decade was out.

NBC’s Harry Smith told the story about Collins sometimes walking in the evening, looking up at the moon and quietly saying, “Oh, I’ve been up there.”

 

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