Jacaranda Trees | A Love-Hate Relationship

Jacaranda blossoms have created a purple canopy along streets in South Pasadena. While they’re an awe-inspiring sight for some, their fallen leaves are a sticky menace for others

PHOTO: Bill Glazier | SouthPasadenan.com News | Jacaranda blossoms have created a purple canopy along Marengo and Fremont avenues and others streets in South Pasadena. While they’re an awe-inspiring sight for some, their fallen sticky leaves are a menace for others

Love or hate them, they’re a major part of South Pasadena’s landscape this time of year.

In full bloom are the jacarandas, one of the most exotic-looking trees in the city, with their unparalleled purplish-blue clustered flowers.

PHOTO: Bill Glazier | SouthPasadenan.com News | Jacaranda blossoms along Marengo Avenue

The fallen flowers can be found along Marengo and Fremont avenues, along with many other parts of the city.

However, there’s a love-hate relationship with them, with many residents crying foul when the leaves fall, leaving a sticky substance on cars below. Others shake fists after they leave a mess on sidewalks and in yards and patios they say is impossible to clean. While South Pasadena fashions itself as a City of Trees, some are all in favor if this particular species weren’t among them.

Yet, that can’t take away from their splendor and beauty. Fullerton once hold a Jacaranda Festival, which drew large crowds. In 1972, Glendale declared them their official tree and they’re a pleasant sight at Central Library in downtown Los Angeles after the City of Costa Mesa sold 11 of them.

PHOTO: Bill Glazier | SouthPasadenan.com News | Jacarandas blossoming along Fremont Avenue

The Jacaranda is native to tropical and subtropical regions of Central America, Mexico, South America, Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, the Bahamas, and in Asia, especially in Nepal.

So, are you in favor or disfavor of the Jacaranda?

For those in favor, savor the opportunity to view them, as the lavender blossoms will soon be gone. Those who don’t relish their features recognize the rubbery petals that wreak havoc are about to dry up once the blooming season is over.

For the time being, like them or not, the neon purple Jacaranda will continue to thrive along South Pasadena streets.

 

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